Thu, Aug 26 | Zoom

The Challenges Associated with Failure Analysis in Forensic Science

Despite the critical and often transformative role forensic science has played in the criminal justice system, it has never had uniform guidance, which has complicated standard approaches the development of the science and reporting of results.
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The Challenges Associated with Failure Analysis in Forensic Science

Time & Location

Aug 26, 9:30 PM CDT – Aug 27, 11:00 AM CDT
Zoom

About The Event

Brian Gestring (4n6Services) will lead this interactive session describing the unique challenges associated with root cause analysis in the field of forensic science. He will outline the long-term strategies he is developing to try and overcome them while seeking input from the CHOL community on his approach.

Despite the critical and often transformative role forensic science has played in the criminal justice system, it has never had uniform guidance, which has complicated standard approaches the development of the science and reporting of results. 

While the obstacles remain significant, they are not insurmountable. As the field has been migrating to accreditation under the ISO 17020 and 17025 programs, the requirements for root cause analysis and corrective action are becoming more robust.  Unfortunately, there is still a significant knowledge gap in how to perform these critical functions. This is due to the various pathways to becoming a forensic scientist. Most current practitioners have traditional science degrees with little to no formal education in quality assurance and only receive limited exposure at work if at all. 

This presentation will introduce the CHOL community to the world of forensic science, describe its history and evolution, outline the challenges, and seek input on proposed long-term solutions to try and create cultures of quality and continuous improvement within the field.

About the Speaker: 

Brian Gestring is a forensic science consultant who has worked in almost every aspect of forensic science for nearly three decades.As a practitioner, he has worked as a scene investigator, a bench-level criminalist, a supervisory criminalist, a crime laboratory manager, and a state executive.  As an academic, he served as the Director of a forensic science program and held two full-time faculty positions teaching undergraduate and graduate forensic science coursework at two different institutions. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and certified by the International Association of Identification as a Senior Crime Scene Analyst.

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